This Material Can Convert Infrared Light to Renewable Energy

By Nishchay Pandey

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Scientists based in Bengaluru have reportedly found a material that converts infrared light into renewable energy. They have discovered a new material which can emit, detect, and modulate infrared light with high efficiency making it useful for solar and thermal energy harvesting and also for optical communication devices. According to a news release scientists at Bengaluru’s Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) have found a novel substance termed “single-crystalline scandium nitride” that can transform infrared light into renewable energy. Scientists from the Centre for Nano Science and Engineering from the University of Sydney and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) also took part in this research that was released recently in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

The electromagnetic waves are a renewable energy source used for the generation of electricity, telecommunication, defence and security technologies, sensors, and healthcare services. Although infrared radiation is invisible to humans, they can feel its heat. It is used by night vision goggles. The researchers used a scientific phenomenon called “polariton excitations” to be able to convert it into renewable energy. Assistant Professor at JNCASR Dr Bivas Saha, said that from electronics-to-healthcare, defence and security-to-energy technologies, there is a massive need for infrared sources, sensors and emitters. He added that the work here on infrared polaritons in scandium nitride is also set to enable its applications in many such devices.

The researchers used a scientific phenomenon called “polariton excitations” to achieve this feat. Assistant Professor at JNCASR, Dr Bivas Saha, said that from electronics to healthcare, defence and security to energy technologies, there is a massive need for infrared sources, sensors and emitters. He added that the work here on infrared polaritons in scandium nitride is also set to enable its applications in many such devices. Scientists from the Centre for Nano Science and Engineering from the University of Sydney and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) also took part in this research that was released recently in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

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The article can be found here.


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